Psoriasis Articles A-Z

Triamcinolone Acetonide Ointment and Breastfeeding - What Kind of Exercise Is Most Beneficial for Those With Psoriatic Arthritis?

This page contains links to eMedTV Psoriasis Articles containing information on subjects from Triamcinolone Acetonide Ointment and Breastfeeding to What Kind of Exercise Is Most Beneficial for Those With Psoriatic Arthritis?. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
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  • Triamcinolone Acetonide Ointment and Breastfeeding
    This eMedTV page explores triamcinolone acetonide ointment (Kenalog ointment) and breastfeeding, explaining that it is unknown if this drug passes through breast milk. This page also covers what to discuss with your doctor before using this drug.
  • Triamcinolone Acetonide Ointment and Pregnancy
    As this eMedTV article explains, using triamcinolone acetonide ointment (Kenalog ointment) during pregnancy may increase the risk of birth defects or other problems. This page further explores this topic, including what your doctor may recommend.
  • Triamcinolone Acetonide Ointment Dosage
    This eMedTV page explains that the dosing guidelines for triamcinolone acetonide ointment call for a thin layer to be applied to the affected areas two to four times daily. This page explores the dosing guidelines for this drug.
  • Triamcinolone Acetonide Ointment Information
    This eMedTV page offers important information on triamcinolone acetonide ointment, a drug prescribed to treat skin conditions like eczema and psoriasis. This article also explains why this drug is not suitable for everyone and lists possible side effects.
  • Triamcinolone Acetonide Ointment Overdose
    As this eMedTV resource discusses, overdosing on triamcinolone acetonide ointment (Kenalog ointment) may decrease the body's ability to make natural steroids. This article describes other possible overdose symptoms and available treatment options.
  • Triamcinolone Acetonide Ointment Side Effects
    Acne, stretch marks, and sweating are some of the possible side effects of triamcinolone acetonide ointment. This eMedTV page lists other potential reactions to this medicine, including serious problems to report and some of the effects of long-term use.
  • Types of Psoriasis
    This eMedTV article takes a look at the different types of psoriasis, such as inverse, pustular, and erythrodermic psoriasis. As this page explains, each type has its own symptoms and risk factors, but they are all related to rapid cell turnover.
  • Uses for Triamcinolone Acetonide Ointment
    Psoriasis, eczema, and poison ivy are some of the uses for triamcinolone acetonide ointment. This eMedTV article describes some of the skin conditions this drug is prescribed to treat, including unapproved uses. A link to more details is also included.
  • UVB and Psoriasis
    As explained in this eMedTV article, ultraviolet B (UVB) therapy is a psoriasis treatment that uses artificial light to improve affected skin. This page covers UVB treatment in more detail, with information on both broadband and narrowband treatment.
  • Vanos
    Available by prescription only, Vanos is approved to treat skin conditions like dermatitis and eczema. This eMedTV resource offers a complete overview of this medicated skin cream, including what it is used for, how it works, and dosing guidelines.
  • Vanos 0.1%
    As this eMedTV segment discusses, people with dermatitis, eczema, or certain other skin problems may benefit from Vanos 0.1% cream. This article explains how this drug works, how to apply it, and side effects. A link to more details is also included.
  • Vanos and Breastfeeding
    This page of the eMedTV Web site discusses whether it is safe for women who are breastfeeding to use Vanos (fluocinonide cream). This resource takes a look at whether this drug passes through breast milk and if it would harm a nursing infant.
  • Vanos and Pregnancy
    If a pregnant woman uses Vanos (fluocinonide cream), it may cause harm to the fetus. This eMedTV segment discusses the results of animal studies done on this drug, and explains why the FDA has classified it as a pregnancy Category C medicine.
  • Vanos and Psoriasis
    As this eMedTV page explains, using Vanos for psoriasis treatment can help relieve itching and inflammation this and other skin conditions may cause. This article explains how this drug works, covers dosing information, and links to more details.
  • Vanos Application
    When using Vanos, apply a thin layer of the cream on the affected area of the skin once or twice a day. This eMedTV page offers application tips for those about to use Vanos, and also includes a link to more detailed dosing guidelines on the drug.
  • Vanos Cream Information
    This eMedTV Web page provides information on Vanos, a skin cream prescribed to treat skin conditions like eczema and psoriasis. This page gives a brief overview of how this medicine is used, possible side effects, and what your doctor needs to know.
  • Vanos Dosage
    As this eMedTV page explains, dosing guidelines for Vanos include applying a thin layer of the cream to the affected areas once or twice daily for up to two weeks. This article lists factors that may affect your dose and gives tips for using this drug.
  • Vanos Drug Interactions
    Corticorelin and aldesleukin are some of the drugs that may cause interactions when combined with Vanos. This eMedTV Web page describes the complications that may occur if these medications are taken together and explains what your doctor may recommend.
  • Vanos Overdose
    Your body may stop making its own natural steroids if you use too much Vanos (fluocinonide cream). This eMedTV page takes a closer look at what may happen if you overdose on this drug, including other possible overdose symptoms and treatment options.
  • Vanos Side Effects
    Headaches and nasal congestion are some of the possible side effects of Vanos. This eMedTV article offers a detailed look at other possible problems this medicated skin cream may cause, including serious and long-term complications that may occur.
  • Vanos Uses
    As this eMedTV segment discusses, a doctor may recommend Vanos to treat certain skin conditions in adults and children as young as 12 years old. This article takes a look at what Vanos is used for and explains how this prescription skin cream works.
  • Vanos Warnings and Precautions
    A person may not be able to safely use Vanos if he or she has certain allergies or is taking certain drugs. This eMedTV page covers important safety warnings and precautions with Vanos, including what to tell your doctor before using this medicine.
  • Vectical
    Vectical is an ointment used on the skin to treat plaque psoriasis in adults. This eMedTV article offers an overview of this prescription drug, including details on potential side effects, dosing guidelines, and general safety precautions.
  • Vectical and Breastfeeding
    It is unknown if Vectical (calcitriol ointment) passes through breast milk. This page of the eMedTV Web library explains whether it is safe for women who are breastfeeding to use Vectical and describes the potential problems that may occur.
  • Vectical and Pregnancy
    Vectical (calcitriol ointment) may pose risks when used by women who are expecting. This eMedTV segment describes what happened when Vectical was used on pregnant animals and discusses when a doctor will prescribe this ointment during pregnancy.
  • Vectical Dosage
    As this eMedTV resource explains, dosing guidelines for Vectical call for a thin layer to be applied to the affected areas of skin twice daily. This page takes a closer look at how to use this drug, including important steps for using it effectively.
  • Vectical Drug Interactions
    This eMedTV article explains that drug interactions may occur if Vectical is used with too much vitamin D, calcium, or lithium. This page lists other products that may cause problems and explains how these reactions may lead to high calcium levels.
  • Vectical Medication Information
    Vectical is an ointment prescribed for treating mild-to-moderate plaque psoriasis in adults. This eMedTV page offers more information on Vectical, including how to apply the medication and possible side effects. A link to more details is also included.
  • Vectical Overdose
    This eMedTV page explains that if you use too much Vectical (calcitriol ointment), it can cause problems like high blood calcium. This article describes some of the potentially serious symptoms to look out for and covers possible treatment options.
  • Vectical Side Effects
    Clinical trials have shown that common Vectical side effects include itching and skin discomfort. This eMedTV segment outlines other possible reactions to this skin medicine, including potentially serious problems that you should report to your doctor.
  • Vectical Uses
    If you have plaque psoriasis, your doctor may prescribe Vectical. This eMedTV Web selection takes a closer look at what Vectical is used for, how it works, and when a healthcare provider might prescribe this ointment for other purposes.
  • Vectical Warnings and Precautions
    You may not be able to use Vectical if you have high calcium levels or are taking certain drugs. This eMedTV resource highlights important precautions and safety warnings for Vectical, including potentially serious complications that may occur.
  • What Drugs Are Used to Treat Psoriatic Arthritis?
    Many different drugs are used to treat psoriatic arthritis, some of which are sold over-the-counter (OTC). This eMedTV segment lists some of the medications available, such as naproxen and infliximab, and discusses the ones that are typically avoided.
  • What Is Cormax?
    If you have psoriasis, eczema, or other skin conditions, you may benefit from Cormax. This eMedTV page takes a look at what Cormax is used for, describes dosing information, and explains how it works. A link to more details is also included.
  • What Is Cyclocort Cream?
    If you have eczema, poison ivy, or other skin conditions, you may benefit from Cyclocort cream. This eMedTV Web selection takes a look at what Cyclocort cream is used for and how it works. A link to more information on this drug is also included.
  • What Is Cyclosporine Used For?
    People who have had an organ transplant may take cyclosporine to prevent an organ rejection. This eMedTV resource takes a closer look at other approved and unapproved uses for cyclosporine, and describes whether children can take this drug.
  • What Is Cyclosporine?
    Cyclosporine is prescribed to prevent organ rejection and treat severe psoriasis and rheumatoid arthritis. This eMedTV segment further discusses what cyclosporine is, how it works, and how it affects the body. A link to more details is also provided.
  • What Is Etanercept Used For?
    This eMedTV resource discusses how etanercept works to help relieve various inflammatory conditions of the joints and skin. This page also highlights some off-label uses for etanercept and explains who can use the medication.
  • What Is Fluocinonide Ointment Used For?
    This eMedTV segment explains that fluocinonide ointment is used for treating itching and inflammation caused by various skin conditions. This article describes how this prescription drug works and lists specific uses, including possible off-label uses.
  • What Is Golimumab Used For?
    As explained in this eMedTV segment, golimumab is used for rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, psoriatic arthritis, and ulcerative colitis. This article discusses both the approved and unapproved uses of this product.
  • What Is Halobetasol Used For?
    As explained in this eMedTV Web article, halobetasol is used for treating dermatitis, psoriasis, and various other skin conditions. It also discusses how this glucocorticoid works, describes off-label uses, and explains whether it is safe for children.
  • What Is Locoid Cream?
    People with certain skin problems like eczema or psoriasis may benefit from Locoid cream. This eMedTV resource takes a brief look at what Locoid cream is used for and how it works. A link to more information on this medication is also included.
  • What Is Methotrexate Used For?
    Methotrexate is approved to treat several conditions, including cancer and severe, disabling psoriasis. This eMedTV resource offers more details on these and other methotrexate uses, including "off-label" purposes and its use in children.
  • What Is Olux-E Foam?
    If you have dermatitis, eczema, or other skin conditions, you may benefit from Olux-E. This eMedTV segment takes a look at what Olux-E foam is used for, describes dosing information, and explains how it works. A link to more details is also included.
  • What Is Temovate?
    People with certain skin problems like poison ivy or eczema may benefit from Temovate. This page from the eMedTV Web library takes a look at what Temovate is used for and how it works. A link to more information on this drug is also included.
  • What Is Triamcinolone Acetonide Ointment Used For?
    As this eMedTV page discusses, triamcinolone acetonide ointment is used for treating inflammation and itching of the skin. This article explains how this prescription drug works, covers specific uses, and discusses whether it has "off-label" uses.
  • What Is Triamcinolone Acetonide Ointment?
    A doctor may prescribe triamcinolone acetonide ointment to treat skin conditions like eczema and psoriasis. This eMedTV page offers a brief description of what triamcinolone acetonide ointment is used for. A link to more details is also provided.
  • What Kind of Exercise Is Most Beneficial for Those With Psoriatic Arthritis?
    Just because a person has psoriatic arthritis, it doesn't mean he or she can't exercise. In fact, as this eMedTV segment explains, exercise can have several benefits for people with this condition, provided they are the right kinds of exercises.
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