Psoriasis Articles A-Z

Generic Etanercept - Locoid Drug Interactions

This page contains links to eMedTV Psoriasis Articles containing information on subjects from Generic Etanercept to Locoid Drug Interactions. The information is organized alphabetically; the "Favorite Articles" contains the top articles on this page. Links in the box will take you directly to the articles; those same links are available with a short description further down the page.
Favorite Articles
Descriptions of Articles
  • Generic Etanercept
    There may never be a generic etanercept available because it is a biologic medication. This eMedTV article explains why generic biologics are not manufactured and also warns people about companies claiming to sell a generic version of the drug.
  • Generic Kenalog Cream
    This eMedTV segment explains that only generic versions of Kenalog cream (triamcinolone acetonide cream) are available because the brand-name form is no longer made. This page also explains whether these generics are as good as the brand-name drug.
  • Generic Locoid
    Some of the Locoid (hydrocortisone butyrate) products are available in generic form. This eMedTV Web page explains which generic Locoid products are currently available and estimates when other generic versions may be manufactured.
  • Generic Luxiq
    As this eMedTV segment explains, Luxiq (betamethasone valerate foam) is now available in generic form. This article talks in detail about the generic version of the drug, including how it compares to brand-name Luxiq.
  • Generic Olux
    As explained in this eMedTV Web selection, generic Olux and Olux-E are available. This article takes a closer look at these generic products, including who makes them and whether they are as good as the brand-name drugs.
  • Generic Soriatane
    Generic Soriatane (acitretin) is now available in two different strengths. This eMedTV article explains why the FDA has assigned an "AB" rating to generic Soriatane and what this means when compared to the brand-name version.
  • Generic Sorilux
    This eMedTV Web resource explains why there are currently no generic Sorilux products available. This page describes when a generic might become available and describes some generic medications that may be more affordable options for some people.
  • Generic Stelara
    As this eMedTV article explains, generic Stelara (ustekinumab) is unavailable at this time. This article looks into the laws surrounding this product and explains why it's hard to say when generic versions of "biologic" drugs like Stelara will be made.
  • Generic Taclonex
    As explained in this eMedTV article, Taclonex is now sold in generic form -- but only for the ointment form of the drug. This resource gives an overview of the generic version and explains how you can reduce the cost of Taclonex scalp suspension.
  • Generic Tazorac
    At this time, generic Tazorac is unavailable in the United States. This selection from the eMedTV archives talks about when a generic version may become available and explains why tazarotene is not the same as a generic version of the drug.
  • Generic Temovate
    There are generic Temovate (clobetasol propionate) products currently available. This eMedTV Web page takes an in-depth look at these generic versions, including the various forms available and whether they are as good as the brand-name medicine.
  • Generic Topicort
    There are generic Topicort (desoximetasone) products available at this time. This eMedTV Web selection takes a closer look at these generic medications, including the various forms available and whether they are as good as the brand-name medicine.
  • Generic Vanos
    Is it possible to buy a Vanos (fluocinonide cream) in generic form? Yes, as this selection from the eMedTV site explains. This article takes a look at the single strength in which the generic is available, who makes it, and more.
  • Generic Vectical
    At this time, there are no generic Vectical (calcitriol ointment) products available. This eMedTV page explores when a generic version might become available and covers why calcitriol is considered a generic name rather than a generic version of the drug.
  • Golimumab
    A prescription drug, golimumab is used to treat psoriatic arthritis and other inflammatory conditions. This eMedTV Web page offers an overview of this product, with information on side effects, dosing guidelines, and drug warnings.
  • Golimumab Dosage
    Golimumab is typically injected once a month. This eMedTV page discusses the dosing guidelines for this medication in more detail, explaining where the injections should be given and who may administer them.
  • Golimumab Drug Information
    Golimumab is a medication used to treat ankylosing spondylitis and certain other conditions. This part of the eMedTV site provides some basic drug information on golimumab, such as common side effects. A link to a full-length article is also provided.
  • Halabetasol
    A doctor may prescribe halobetasol to treat eczema, dermatitis, or various other skin problems. This eMedTV Web page offers a brief overview of this skin medicine, including some general dosing tips. Halabetasol is a common misspelling of halobetasol.
  • Halbetasol
    Halobetasol is a medicine licensed to treat psoriasis, dermatitis, eczema, and various other skin problems. This eMedTV article gives a brief overview of this drug and provides a link to more information. Halbetasol is a common misspelling of halobetasol.
  • Halbetasol Cream
    As this eMedTV article explains, halobetasol cream and ointment are prescribed to treat certain skin conditions. This page covers how this medicine works and lists possible side effects. Halbetasol cream is a common misspelling of halobetasol.
  • Halbetasol Propionate
    As this eMedTV page explains, halobetasol is prescribed to treat certain skin conditions, such as eczema and psoriasis. This page covers how this drug works and lists side effects. Halbetasol propionate is a common misspelling of halobetasol propionate.
  • Halobetasol
    Available only with a prescription, halobetasol is a medicine used to treat a wide variety of skin conditions. This eMedTV page presents an in-depth look at halobetasol, including skin problems it is approved to treat, dosing tips, side effects, and more.
  • Halobetasol Cream
    If you have eczema or dermatitis, a doctor may prescribe an ointment or cream form of halobetasol. This eMedTV Web page offers a brief description of what this medicine is used for and how it works. A link to more information is also provided.
  • Halobetasol Dosage
    This article from the eMedTV Web library describes the guidelines for dosing with halobetasol cream or ointment. This article explains how often the drug is applied, offers tips on using it, and discusses why it should not be used for more than two weeks.
  • Halobetasol Ointment
    This eMedTV Web page discusses halobetasol ointment and cream, which can help relieve itching and inflammation caused by psoriasis, eczema, and certain other skin conditions. This page offers an overview of this drug and provides a link to more details.
  • Halobetasol Propionate Cream
    People with skin conditions like dermatitis or eczema may benefit from halobetasol propionate cream. This eMedTV page offers a brief description of what this medicine is used for and possible side effects. A link to more details is also provided.
  • Halobetasol Propionate Drug Information
    This eMedTV resource presents a brief overview of halobetasol propionate, with information on how this drug works to treat skin conditions like eczema and psoriasis. This article also links to more details on dosing guidelines, side effects, and more.
  • Halobetasol Propionate Ointment
    A doctor may prescribe halobetasol ointment or cream to treat eczema, poison ivy, or other skin problems. This eMedTV page offers some details on what this medicine is prescribed for, how it works, and dosing tips. A link to more details is also provided.
  • Halobetasol Propronate Cream
    A doctor may prescribe halobetasol to treat eczema, dermatitis, or other skin problems. This eMedTV article covers specific uses of the drug and links to more details. Halobetasol propronate cream is a common misspelling of halobetasol propionate cream.
  • Halobetasol Side Effects
    As with any drug, problems are possible with halobetasol and are described in detail in this eMedTV segment. Some common halobetasol side effects listed in this article include skin burning or stinging. A list of serious complications is also provided.
  • Halobetsol Ointment
    This eMedTV page offers a brief overview of halobetasol ointment and cream, including how these products work to treat several skin conditions. A link to more information is included. Halobetsol ointment is a common misspelling of halobetasol ointment.
  • Information on Psoriasis
    Psoriasis is a skin disease that is often characterized by patches of thick, red skin with silvery scales. This eMedTV article gives a brief overview of psoriasis, with information on what causes it, treatment options, and more.
  • Is DesOwen Available Over-the-Counter?
    As this eMedTV article explains, DesOwen is not available over-the-counter (OTC). This page takes a look at this prescription medication, including what it is used for and why it is not suitable for some people. A link to more details is also included.
  • Is Diet Related to Psoriatic Arthritis?
    Although there is no clear link between diet and psoriatic arthritis symptoms, this eMedTV article explains that keeping a food diary and eliminating certain foods can't hurt. It can benefit your overall health and may help you identify "triggers."
  • Is Gluten Intolerance Related to Psoriatic Arthritis?
    This eMedTV selection explains that there is no clear relationship between gluten intolerance and psoriatic arthritis. A gluten-free diet may help someone with this condition, but not always. This page describes the results of studies on this topic.
  • Is Light Therapy Beneficial for Psoriatic Arthritis?
    This eMedTV page explains that although the FDA has not approved light therapy for psoriatic arthritis, early evidence shows this may be a promising treatment option. This page discusses the benefits of light therapy and how it compares to tanning beds.
  • Is There a Relationship Between Psoriatic Arthritis and Inflammatory Bowel Disease?
    There is no clear link between psoriatic arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease. However, this eMedTV page explains why the two might appear together since both are autoimmune conditions. The drugs used for psoriatic arthritis might also be responsible.
  • Kenalog Cream
    Available by prescription only, Kenalog cream is used to treat skin conditions like eczema and psoriasis. This eMedTV article takes an in-depth look at this medicated skin cream, including specific uses, how it works, how to apply it, and more.
  • Kenalog Cream Dosage
    As this eMedTV page explains, dosing guidelines for Kenalog cream call for a thin layer of the cream to be applied to the affected areas two to four times daily. This article lists factors that may affect your dose and gives tips for using this drug.
  • Kenalog Cream Drug Interactions
    Kenalog cream may negatively react with a few medicines, including aldesleukin and corticorelin. This page of the eMedTV Web library takes a closer look at the possible complications that may occur from these drug interactions with Kenalog cream.
  • Kenalog Cream Information
    This eMedTV resource provides information on Kenalog cream, a medication prescribed to treat a variety of skin conditions. This page gives a brief overview of how this skin cream is used, possible side effects, and what your doctor needs to know.
  • Kenalog Cream Side Effects
    Sweating, stretch marks, and acne are some of the possible side effects of Kenalog cream. This eMedTV Web selection outlines other possible problems this medicated skin cream may cause, including some of the long-term complications that may occur.
  • Kenalog Cream Uses
    A healthcare provider may prescribe Kenalog cream to treat certain skin conditions in adults and children. This eMedTV page explores specific uses of Kenalog cream, including possible off-label uses. An explanation of how the drug works is also included.
  • Kenalog Cream Warnings and Precautions
    You may not be able to safely use Kenalog cream if you have certain allergies or are taking certain drugs. This eMedTV page covers important safety warnings and precautions with Kenalog cream, including what to tell your doctor before using this product.
  • Kenolog Cream
    Kenalog cream is a medicine licensed to treat skin conditions, such as eczema and dermatitis. This eMedTV article discusses some dosing guidelines, possible side effects, and safety precautions. Kenolog cream is a common misspelling of Kenalog cream.
  • Light Therapy for Psoriasis
    The different forms of light therapy for psoriasis include sunlight, UVB, and PUVA therapy. As this eMedTV page explains, light therapy helps improve the appearance of scaly, inflamed skin. This page covers the benefits and risks of light therapy.
  • Locoid
    Locoid is available by prescription only and is used to relieve symptoms of various skin conditions. This eMedTV Web page provides an overview of this topical medicine, including how it works to reduce inflammation, possible side effects, and more.
  • Locoid and Breastfeeding
    Consult your healthcare provider before using Locoid (hydrocortisone butyrate) while breastfeeding. This eMedTV page takes a look at whether this medicine passes through breast milk and explains why it may not be safe for nursing mothers to use this drug.
  • Locoid and Pregnancy
    Is it safe for pregnant women to use Locoid (hydrocortisone butyrate)? This page of the eMedTV Web site takes a closer look at what happened when this drug was given to pregnant animals and why short-term use during pregnancy may be safe.
  • Locoid Dosage
    This eMedTV resource explains that although your specific Locoid dose will depend on certain factors, usually a small amount of this medicine is applied two or three times daily. This page gives more specific dosing guidelines for various Locoid products.
  • Locoid Drug Interactions
    As this eMedTV segment explains, drug interactions can occur if Locoid is used with aldesleukin or corticorelin. This page describes the complications that may occur when medications are combined and what your doctor may recommend to avoid any problems.
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